I taught my class at the Royal College of Art in June.  For a full recap, check out the article they published about it here.

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See also: Teaching Pleasuring Your Palate at Stanford

On Sunday I taught a farmers market to table cooking class with the Stanford Cooking Society.  We started at the California Avenue Market and walked through, picking out the ingredients we wanted to prepare for our lunch.  We decided on making fresh green nettle pasta with an asparagus and mint sauce.  Everyone wanted to try sunchokes  so we roasted them with some delicata squash and blanched leaks and made an almond salsa verde to go along with it.  We also decided to make a blood orange, pomelo and little gem salad with citrus vinaigrette.  We headed back to Story House to start cooking.

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design-manifesto

I’m take a digital media interaction design class at the d.school this quarter with some awesome mentors.  I designed these icons for our first project as a representation of some of my passions.

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This piece explores how everyday objects are unhappy about the way they are used and the lengths they go to escape their designed destiny. By giving every day objects autonomy, we want to question and re-invent their purpose, context and expression in the world.  The video was shown next to a box of concrete replica ear plugs that we made and sealed back into the plastic packaging.

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produced, filmed & edited by David Bordow & Wei Li
music: “Doorstep” by Tune-Yards

I was experimenting with ways to let concrete set formed around bubbles. Basically, I blew bubbles in a cup of setting Rockite with a straw. This is the result. It feels awesome but cracks easily when touched.

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I wanted to play with perspectives and perception in Drowned.  By exploring a common household fixture, the bathtub, I aim to conjure feelings of uncertainty, forcing the user into an uncomfortable world that actually becomes quite comical after absorbing it for a few moments. During the exhibition, I occasionally returned to check on the piece and noticed that viewers were shifting ducks around to reveal the mannequin’s nose and face, as if to give it air.

The piece includes a salvaged cast iron claw foot tub from the 1800’s, over 200 cast concrete ducks, one bronze investment cast duck and mannequin legs, head and a wig.  It was displayed during the Materialists show at the Thomas Welton Gallery at Stanford from March 11 – April 27, 2014.

Building circuits that read IR circuits in preparation for building a robot. A killer robot.

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newest members of the ME318 CNC class’s watch club.

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